German court has fined Facebook $109,000 in IP dispute case

German court has fined Facebook $109,000 in IP dispute case

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German court has fined Facebook $109,000 in IP dispute case

German court has fined Facebook $109,000 in IP dispute case: According to the latest news, Facebook has been charged a fine of as much as 100,000 euros which is equivalent to 109,000 dollars. They were charged because Facebook supposedly had refused to inform certain users regarding the way the used the intellectual property of the users. A consumer group had claimed that Facebook refused to follow a certain order and thus it was fined with such a huge amount.German court has fined Facebook $109,000 in IP dispute case

German court has fined Facebook $109,000 in IP dispute case

In response to such a thing, the CEO of Facebook himself visited Germany to look into the matter. Previous week, Mark Zuckerberg himself tried solving the problem and tried diluting the antipathy that had generated amongst the people. Issues regarding data protection was also looked into and they aimed at making the leading social networking site, Facebook better.

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According to the hearing at the regional court in Berlin, the most leading social media site has not corrected a certain clause regarding intellectual property that they were supposed to and thus they were sued. They did not maintain the terms and conditions that were penned down. It is said that the news was framed and filed by the Federation of German Consumer Organization also known as the VZBZ.

According to the head of the organization, Klaus Mueller, Facebook constantly tries to go against the consumer laws which are stated in several countries in Europe including Germany. According to him, the companies who are involved should apply their judicial decisions on the giant tech company. They should not let it do anything it feels like and the companies should not sit idle.

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The verdict was given finally by a spokeswoman in the court in Berlin.

The court also claims that Facebook has not penned down any discrete terms and conditions regarding whether the intellectual property of the users such as the videos as well as the photos. They did not mention to what extent they could access them and whether these photos and other confidential properties were made available for any third party and if so to what extent.

The security of the users should be handles with utmost care.